5 reasons not to do DIY this Bank Holiday

Today is a Bank Holiday in the UK, which means that homeowners up and down the country will be devoting their day to home improvements. Here are five reasons why that might be the biggest mistake ever.

Today is a Bank Holiday in the UK, which means that homeowners up and down the country will be devoting their day to home improvements. Before you pick up that hammer, though, here are five reasons why that might be the biggest mistake ever.

1. It almost always goes wrong

People dusting off their to-do lists will spend an average of five and a half hours each on DIY – but 2 million households will experience a DIY disaster this Bank Holiday weekend, according to new research from Privilege Insurance.

Using data from people’s past DIY experiences, including the last British Bank Holiday, the insurer’s list of most likely DIY disasters to happen include getting paint somewhere it’s not supposed to be, drilling a hole that’s too big for purpose, pictures falling down, staining the carpet or flat pack furniture falling to pieces.

2. It causes injury

Who hasn’t hammered their fingers instead of a nail? Personal injury is the third most likely thing to go wrong, according to Privilege. That’s perhaps no surprise, though, given a recent survey from Nationwide revealed that Drunk DIY is on the up, with a quarter of Brits admitting to “having a go” at a task after a few glasses of wine.

3. It ruins relationships

The lender’s survey also found that one in seven (15 per cent) reported that ham-fisted handiwork around the home had affected their relationship, with 2 per cent saying it had helped to end the relationship entirely.

Common reasons given for shoddy workmanship to Privilege include trying to do the work too quickly (27 per cent), not concentrating (17 per cent) and thinking it ‘looked easy’ (14 per cent). According to installer network Network VEKA, though, 41 per cent of DIY-ers said the obstacle was their other half, noting they “often argue” about what they want to do to their home, whether to get a professional in or attempt it themselves, and which home improvement to prioritise.

4. It costs money

DIY is meant to be the affordable alternative to getting a professional in, but that doesn’t take into account the things that go wrong. Brits will spend £58 million fixing botched DIY jobs this weekend, according to Nationwide, the equivalent of just under £30 for every household.

5. It takes time

Money isn’t the only expense: DIY takes time too. British householders will be spending over 20 million hours on DIY this weekend, with 1 million of those spent trying to fix jobs that have gone wrong.

It’s all part of the national obsession with getting their home just right, suggests Network VEKA, with the average Brit saying they need to spend more than £18,000 and four-and-a-half years working on their home before they can consider it perfect. Installing a new kitchen and bathroom, laying new carpets or flooring and building a conservatory or an extension are among the top improvements Brits want to do to their home before they will view it as complete.

Less than one in ten homeowners currently consider their home to be perfect with 55 per cent saying they have a long to-do list of improvements and changes they would like to get done.

Three quarters, meanwhile, worry they are never going to get their homes to a point where they are completely happy with them because of a lack of time, money and know-how.

 

It’s not all bad, though: a brave 15 per cent of Brits still solder on with all DIY work themselves, while almost one in four couples told Nationwide DIY had become the subject of laughter instead of emotional disaster.

On top of that, over half of Brits (according to Network VEKA) spend an average of 10 hours a month looking at property sites in search of home inspiration.

We highly recommend that last part.

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